THE BEST OF TANGO

tango

SUNDAY, AUGUST 3
THE BEST OF TANGO
RAUL JAURENA, Bandoneon – Trio
MARGA MITCHELL, Vocalist
CAROLINA JAURENA and ANDRES BRAVO, Dancers

2 pm Rockwood Drive Circle, Van Cortlandt Park
4 pm Fordham University, Bronx Rose Hill Campus

PROGRAM

9 PUNTOS…………………………Tango…………Instrumental………Francisco Canaro
LA YUMBA…………………………Tango…………Baile……………….Osvaldo Pugliese
SI SUPIERAS……………………..Waltz…………Vocal……………….Pedro Maffia
LA TRILLA………………………..Milonga……..Instrumental…..Raul Jaurena
TANGUERA……………………….Tango………..Baile……………….Mariano Mores
COMO DOS EXTRAÑOS……Tango…………Vocal………………Pedro Laurenz
INVIERNO PORTEÑO………Tango…………Instrumental……Astor Piazzolla
MILONGA DEL 900…………..Milonga……..Dancers………….Sebastian Piana
A LA GRAN MUÑECA………..Tango…………Dancers…………Agustin Bardi
CAMINITO………………………..Tango…………Company………..Juan de Dios Filiberto

TANGO is a style of music in 2/4 or 4/4 time that originated among European immigrant populations of Uruguay and Argentina (the “Rioplatenses”). It is traditionally played on solo guitar, guitar duo, or an ensemble known as orquesta tipica, including two violins, flute, piano, double bass and at least two bandoneóns. Sometimes guitars and clarinet join the ensemble. Tango may be purely instrumental or include a vocalist. Even though present forms developed in the above countries from the mid-19th century, there are records of 19th and early 20th century tango styles in Cuba and Spain. A flamenco tango dance may share a common ancestor with a minuet-style European dance.

The first tango ever recorded was made by ANGEL VILLOLDO and played by the French National Guard in Paris. Villoldo had to record in Paris because there was no recording studio in Argentina at the time.

Early tango was played by immigrants in Buenos Aires and Montevideo by the first generation of tango players called “Guardia Vieja” (Old Guard). In early 20th century it was the favorite music of thugs and gangsters who visited the brothels. Complex dances arose from such rich music reflects how men would practice the dance in groups, demonstrating male sexuality, causing a blending of emotion and aggressiveness. The music was played on portable instruments – flute, guitar and violin trios, with bandoneón arriving at the end of the 19th century. The organito, a portable player-organ, broadened certain songs’ popularity. EDUARDO AROLAS popularized the bandoneón, and VICENTE GRECO standardized the tango sextet of piano, double bass, two violins and two bandoneóns.

One of the most widely known of all tango melodies were the first two sections of La Cumparsita of GERARDO MATOS RODRÍGUEZ of Uruguay (1916).

ARGENTINE ROOTS OF TANGO Superstar CARLOS GARDEL soon became a sex symbol who brought tango to new audiences, especially in the United States. In the 1920s bandleaders like ROBERTO FIRPO and FRANCISCO CANARO dropped the flute and added a double bass. Lyrics were typically macho, blaming women for countless heartaches, and dances moves were still sexual and aggressive. CARLOS GARDEL helped develop tango-canción in the 1920s and was a precursor of the Golden Age of Tango. GOLDEN AGE This was the period from about 1935 to 1952, contemporaneous with the big band era in the United States. Some of the many popular and influential orchestras included those of JUAN D’ARIENZO, FRANCISCO CANARO and ANÍBAL TRIOLO. Beginning in the Golden Age and continuing afterwards, orchestras of OSVALDO PUGLIESE and CARLOS DI SARLI made many recordings. Di Sarli had a lush, grandiose sound, emphasizing strings and piano over the bandoneón, heard in “A la gran muñeca” and “Bahía Blanca” (his home town). Pugliese’s first recordings demonstrated a complex, rich and sometimes discordant sound, which is heard in his signature pieces – “Gallo ciego”, “Emancipación” and “La yumba”.

TANGO NUEVO The later age of tango has been dominated by ASTOR PIAZZOLLA, whose Adiós nonino became the most influential work of tango since Gardel’s El día que me quieras of 1935. During the 1950s Piazzolla tried to create a more academic form with new sounds breaking from classic forms of tango, drawing the derision of purists and old-time performers. The 1970s saw Buenos Aires developing a fusion of jazz and tango. In the 1970s and 1980s the vocal octet BUENOS AIRES 8 recorded classic tangos in elaborate arrangements, with complex harmonies and jazz influences.

The so-called post-Piazzolla generation (1980 – ) includes musicians such as Dino Saluzzi, Rodolfo Mederos and Raul Jaurena. Piazzolla and his followers developed Nuevo Tango, which incorporated jazz and classical influences into a more experimental style.

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